Unknown Papers

joy1

I lost count of how many waves of paper I had to cut!

One day it just clicked. I had to make it with paper.  This is one of the most famous album covers from a great band. Personally my discover route was through Depeche Mode. Their image maker, Anton Corbijn directed a movie called Control, which I watched when it came out in my country in 2008. I love New Order, too, but I had been oblivious to Joy Division. I know… that’s kind of unforgivable, but better late than never, right? I’ve discovered so many legendary bands way later than I should have, but I did.

The story of the cover of Unknown Pleasures relates to astronomy, a favorite subject of mine when I was in high school. Radio waves from a pulsar. It’s also quite interesting how our graphic representations of abstract things can carry beauty as well. White on white paper was the choice because this way, light plays a big part in the appeal of this piece. Depending on the light, the waves look different every time you look at them.

And of course, like every paper sculpture project, it always challenges my patience. It may take a lot of time to complete one of these pieces because of the amount of attention to detail they need. I end up exhausted and never wanting to make the same piece again. But it’s always worth it, at least in the sense of accomplishment!

You can buy the original piece which was made in 2014 here (Etsy)

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Music and Words

portrait-with-words-paper-sculpture

A paper portrait. Not bad, huh?

Sometimes you discover a band after their most glorious period and that happened to me with Depeche Mode. Today they announced their 14th studio album but it’s been more than 20 years since their keyboardist and many other titles, Mr. Alan Wilder left the band. Rabid fans still long for his presence… but that’s a very different story. The case is, to me the band wouldn’t be what it is if he hadn’t been there. I discovered his solo project and never looked back.

As a fan I couldn’t help but try to make a portrait. I’ve drawn many portraits of the people I admire but this was the very first one that was made with paper. I tried to be as accurate as possible. But there’s always missing, I think. That’s why I’m not really a portrait girl anymore. I’m proud of this one, though. The blue background was painted with acrylic, and I used some writings with my calligraphy to make the base of the head.

Mr. Wilder’s music has a lot of the spoken word element, hence the name of the work: Music and Words.